Botes’s death a huge loss for Namibian sports:NNSU

WINDHOEK: The death of Quinton-Steele Botes is like a sports library which burned down, a local sports administrator has said.

The National Schools’ Sports Union (NSSU)’s National Coordinator, Solly Duiker said this on Tuesday in reaction to the death of Botes, a well-known sports personality in Namibia.

He passed away on Monday evening after a long battle with Multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells – a type of white blood cell present in human bone marrow.

The Usakos-born Botes, 54, spent several months at a time in Cape Town, South Africa, where he underwent treatment for the cancer which was diagnosed in his body during September 2007.

He had helped establish the NSSU shortly after Namibia’s independence in 1990.

Duiker told Nampa that Botes’s death had left a vacuum in Namibian sports, adding that he literally “took with him great volumes of sports knowledge, some which cannot be found in books”.

He noted that Botes also lived a dignified and honest life.

The Namibia National Olympic Committee (NNOC)’s Secretary-General, Joan Smit also commended Botes’s involvement in the Namibian sports fraternity, adding that his death is a huge loss for Namibian sports.

“Quinton was the only person I know who could deal with people from all levels of society – from grassroots’ level to high-performance level in a professional way,” an emotional Smit told this agency on Tuesday.

Apart from regular athletics’ training clinics across the country, Botes was also a motivational speaker, sports reporter on various radio and television stations, narrator as well as brand ambassador for businesses like Marathon Sugar, Coca-Cola, Avis, Hyundai, Engen and Old Mutual.

Earlier this year, Botes received an award for sporting excellence from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in recognition of his promotion of athletics in Namibia.

Botes leaves behind his wife, Benita, two sons Ibarto and Benton, daughter Quinita and a grandchild.

Funeral arrangements are still being made.

SOURCE: NAMPA