Interpol Arrests French Sex Suspect in Namibia

An alleged French paedophile wanted for sexual crimes against children was arrested last week Friday by Interpol with the assistance of Nampol and immigration officials at Walvis Bay.

The 46-year-old Mathieu Nicolas Furic allegedly tried to enter the country as a fisherman to work on one of the vessels at the coast.

The suspect, who is on the most wanted list of the international crime-fighting organisation, was arrested at the Walvis Bay Airport about 15 kilometres outside the coastal town, when information on the airport system indicated he is wanted for sexual crimes in India.

The crime investigating coordinator for the Erongo Region, Deputy Commissioner Ottilie Kashuupulwa, yesterday afternoon confirmed the arrest and told New Era that the suspect was transported by Nampol to Windhoek on Sunday to make his appearance in the High Court before being extradited to India to face prosecution.

“Vigilant airport officials verified the details quickly and alerted the police at Walvis Bay. They alerted Interpol before the arrest was made,” Kashuupulwa said.

According to Interpol’s profile, Furic is wanted for wrongful constraint, voluntary causing hurt, criminal intimidation and sexual abuse against children and is wanted by the judicial authorities of India for prosecution.

The arrest and extradition of Furic will inevitably again turn the spotlight on Namibia, as the country continues to be a preferred hideout of wanted international criminals, who are on the run from justice elsewhere.

So far at least two other Namibian residents wanted for alleged crimes in other jurisdictions, Jacob (Kobi) Alexander and Boris Bannai, in the United States and Poland respectively, are resisting extradition.

Only one known successful extradition of a foreign national from Namibia – Lebanese businessman Fadi Ayoub – was completed in recent years. Ayoub was returned to France in September 2012 to face a rape charge. He fled France in 1993 after skipping bail and arrived in Namibia in 1999.

Source : New Era