Industry

Bank Windhoek launches new e-Apple Platform

Summary

The Bank Windhoek Cancer Apple on Wednesday launched an e-Apple platform, giving contributors the option of purchasing physical or virtual apples and apple juice.The launch forms part of the project’s 21-year anniversary.The project has since its incep…

The Bank Windhoek Cancer Apple on Wednesday launched an e-Apple platform, giving contributors the option of purchasing physical or virtual apples and apple juice.

The launch forms part of the project’s 21-year anniversary.

The project has since its inception in 2000, grown to become one of Namibia's most important fundraising initiatives and has raised N. dollars 30.5 million for the Cancer Association of Namibia (CAN), assisting the organization in its fight against the disease.

Bank Windhoek Managing Director, Baronice Hans, at the launch said the platform is a web-based application that allows individuals and organizations to support the bank’s Cancer Apple Project from anywhere in the world. It is available all year, and individuals and organizations can use their debit or credit card to make purchases on the e-Apple Platform.

'They can choose a preferred branch across the country from which to collect their physical apples or juice. Normally, the project would begin on July 1st, with sales being coordinated and apples being distributed, and it would conclude in November of the same year with the proceeds being donated to CAN,’ she stated.

Hans said for this cycle – and in light of the significance of Covid-19 – all proceeds from the sale of physical apples, juices, and virtual apples will be donated to CAN in March of 2022 to be followed by the recommencement of the project, with the introduction of the new e-Apple platform.

Rolf Hansen, Chief Executive Officer of CAN, said ‘The success of the Bank Windhoek Cancer Apple Project is the gentle giant that keeps us standing at CAN.’ The project, he said is known by almost every Namibian, and has screened, aided, supported, and saved so many lives, for nearly two generations of school goers for 21 years.

Source: The Namibian Press Agency