Internal Affairs

Genocide, land, unity dominate Ovambanderu-Geingob summit

Summary

The controversial genocide deal, skewed and slow land reform process and unity among Namibians, were among the topics that featured predominantly behind closed doors during a meeting between President Hage Geingob and the Ovambanderu Traditional Author…

The controversial genocide deal, skewed and slow land reform process and unity among Namibians, were among the topics that featured predominantly behind closed doors during a meeting between President Hage Geingob and the Ovambanderu Traditional Authority.

The meeting lasted for over two hours at State House on Wednesday.

Before the media was asked to vacate the presidential boardroom, Geingob stressed unity among Namibians, saying: “We must disagree without being disagreeable.”

On their side, the Ovambanderu delegation expressed gratitude for being presented with an opportunity to deliver their bucket of grievances at the Head of State’s doorsteps.

“It is an honour and privilege to be accorded an opportunity to look into the president’s eyes, face to face,” were the remarks of Gerson Katjirua, the acting Ovambanderu paramount chief (PC).

Tjozohongo Eben Nguvauva, heir to the top Ovambanderu chieftaincy was also in attendance. The authority used the opportunity to introduce their incoming PC.

Nguvauva could not speak publicly until his coronation, Katjirua told Geingob.

The media was then excused.

Two hours later, the traditional body’s spokesperson Ileni Henguva gave an insight into what transpired in the private meeting.

Among others, the traditional authority submitted a dossier to Geingob, in which their issues are captured. It remains classified.

“Land is always an issue because we are talking about community development and as a source of development,” he said.

On the widely contested N.dollars 18 billion genocide pact signed between Germany and Namibia, Henguva said it is a good basis for laying a foundation.

“We strongly believe that we should continue and never take this foot that we have put within the door, out,” said Henguva.

All in all, the spokesman expressed satisfaction in their deliberations.

“We now know the issues of the community that we are representing are at the highest table of the State,” he said.

The Ovambanderu are a divided people, with succession disputes dating back to 2008, when the then PC, Munjuku Nguvauva II passed on. Since then, a succession dispute ensued regarding his successors.

Currently, the Ovambanderu find themselves on two diametrically opposed ends, one spearheaded by Katjirua and another by Aletta Nguvauva, who leads the Ovambanderu Traditional Council.

Source: The Namibian Press Agency