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NCF educates cyclists on the dangers of doping

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The Namibian Cycling Federation (NCF) on Tuesday held a workshop to educate its cyclists on the dangers of doping.The workshop was held in collaboration with the Namibia National Olympic Committee (NNOC) and World Anti-Doping Code and was sponsored by …

The Namibian Cycling Federation (NCF) on Tuesday held a workshop to educate its cyclists on the dangers of doping.

The workshop was held in collaboration with the Namibia National Olympic Committee (NNOC) and World Anti-Doping Code and was sponsored by Nedbank Namibia and Namibia Health Plan.

Jason Snyders from NNOC reminded athletes of what is required from them for them to be considered substance free.

“It remains a responsibility for the NNOC to initiate, implement and enforce the Doping Control Process as well as fulfil its duty under the code, which includes anti-doping tests,” Snyders said.

He added that testing is divided into two categories, which are random testing that can be done at any time, and target testing, which is aimed at contestants who win races so as to prove that the contestant did not use any supplementary substances.

Meanwhile general practitioner Dr Cobus Smith reminded the cyclists to control and analyse medicines prescribed to them by their doctors.

“In case athletes are under treatment it remains a priority of a contestant who qualifies for any competition to inform the anti-doping body about their health status before the event takes place,” he said.

Lisa Dreyer, a cyclist and lawyer by profession who tested positive for a banned substance after competing in the 2020 edition of the Tour de Windhoek, presented a motivational speech during the workshop session.

“Being a lover of the sport and as a cyclist who was in second place during the Tour de Windhoek I had undergone this process. It is not easy to cope when you test positive for taking medication to treat your health while it is a substance banned by WADA. I had to go through a panel of judges. At times it feels like you did nothing wrong because you were being treated, but as athletes it is important to know what we put in our bodies,” Dreyer said.

Source: Namibia Press Agency